CCR Diver Sonia Rowley Wins Sir David Attenborough Award

Systematics Association, Linnean Society of London, Sonia Rowley, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing CompanyIn May 1937 the Systematics Association was founded as the "Committee on Systematics in Relation to General Biology". The idea was to provide a forum to discuss theoretical and practical problems of taxonomy.

Today the Systematics Association furthers all aspects of Systematic biology. This includes organising conferences, training courses and awarding grants to support systematics research.

Sonia Rowley, Robert Whitton, ccr diver, This Girl Can Dive, Poseidon rebreathers, David Attenborough Award, Rosemary Lunn, Roz Lunn, Gorgonian Corals, Pakin Atoll, Micronesia, Richard Pyle , Linnean Society of London, The Underwater Marketing Company, Systematics Association, University of Hawaii, Dave Pence,
Photo Credit: Robert Whitton

In the last few days it has been confirmed that Dr Sonia J Rowley, a deep CCR diver and a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Hawaii has received the prestigious Sir David Attenborough Award for Fieldwork from the Systematics Association and the Linnean Society of London.

Sonia is only the second person to receive this award. It was given for her for her work during the 2015 Pohnpei Expedition. Her report was entitled the "Exploration and Systematics of Twilight Reef Gorgonian Corals at Pakin Atoll, Micronesia."

Other members of the 2015 diving expedition team were Brian Greene and Dr Richard Pyle.

"I am delighted to have received such a prestigious award, and that we can continue to implement advances in rebreather technology in research that not only reveals new discoveries to science, but also assists local community marine resource conservation [in low-lying atolls being perhaps the most vulnerable to sea level change."

Congratulations Sonia!

Have You Seen SAMS Acoustic Detectors?

SAMS - The Scottish Association for Marine Science - has just put out this request. Please pass it on.

SAMS, The Scottish Association for Marine Science, Martin Sayer, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, South of MullThis is a request for assistance to all those of you who spend time along the seashore, both professionally and recreationally.

We have just completed fieldwork that involved deployment of a large array of moorings with acoustic detectors in and around Bloody Bay in the northwestern Sound of Mull (roughly in the area between Tobermory, Loch Sunart, Kilchoan and Ardmore Point – (see below map).

Last week we went out to recover the moorings and found that two had disappeared.

SAMS, The Scottish Association for Marine Science, Martin Sayer, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, acoustic detector, Bloody BayThe first missing mooring was originally deployed at 56° 40.391’ N, 06° 02.210’ W (near Maclean’s Nose, close to the entrance to Loch Sunart).

It consists of a clump of weight (~20 kg chain + anchor), to which are attached a Sonardyne LRT acoustic release unit, a short (<10m) line (standard green 12mm nonsinking rope) with two solid, orange trawl floats at the top.

The line also has attached to it a single C-POD acoustic detector (labelled #1654).

SAMS, The Scottish Association for Marine Science, Martin Sayer, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, acoustic detector, Bloody BayThe second mooring was originally deployed at 56° 38.732’ N, 06° 05.794’ W (inshore in Bloody Bay), is actually one component of a larger mooring.

The missing component consists of a ~35m-long line (standard green 12mm nonsinking rope) with a large white float + small solid orange trawl float at one end.

Near the other end, the line has attached to it another C-POD (labelled #1714) as well as a Soundtrap acoustic detector.

Any help in tracing them would be greatly appreciated.