Earth Day 2017: Dive Point’s Plastic Pledge

Matthias Breit, Regina Rinkenburger, Dive Point, Red Sea Diving, scuba diving Hurghada, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving stories, diving PR, Earth Day
A Dive Point day-boat heading home following a day's diving in the Red Sea

Dive Point, a recreational and technical diving centre based in Hurghada, Egypt has made a plastic pledge to coincide with this year’s Earth Day, by permanently reducing their onboard plastic waste.

UNESCO, John McConnell, Matthias Breit, Regina Rinkenburger, Dive Point, Red Sea Diving, scuba diving Hurghada, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving stories, diving PR, Earth Day
Dive Point's new water drinking fountain contains 19 litres of water, ensuring that the guests don't use 31 small plastic bottles

In 1969 at a UNESCO conference John McConnell proposed that an annual day be put in place to support and promote environmental protection. The first ‘Earth Day’ was held on the first day of spring (in the northern hemisphere) on 21st March 1970. The date later moved to 22nd April.

“We are always looking at ways to recycle and we wanted to mark Earth Day in a positive manner”, stated Regina Rinkenburger, Dive Point’s Operation Manager. In some countries, such as Germany and Canada it is really easy to recycle. In Egypt it can be more challenging, therefore we need to be cleverer with our waste.

We have found that recycling plastic is not a simple process; hence we must put in place as many ways as we can to reduce our plastic use. This week we have installed 19 litre water fountains on our dive boats. Each fountain is the equivalent of 31 small plastic bottles of water. Guests are welcome to fill their water containers as many times as they like. These fountains have already made a huge difference to the amount of plastic waste coming off our boats.”


Better Balloon Release News

What a great way to start the week. We have three pieces of positive #BalloonRelease news!

As March drew to a close we talked to the British magazine Horse & Hound about the Marine Conservation Society's online pledge. The MCS is actively urging people to sign their pledge to help the charity create an interactive map, to show support for balloon release bans around the UK.

As you can see in the news cutting below, we are delighted that news of the MCS #BalloonRelease Pledge made it into Horse & Hound.

"The Marine Conservation Society launched a campaign on 22 March, calling on people to lobby the councils to ban balloon and lantern releases, as it has seen the harm they cause to sea and shore life."

TUMC's Roz Lunn was also quoted in this article.

'Rosemary Lunn, who works in communications in the diving industry, pointed out that Helium is a finite resource and is needed for vital work in medicine. "Times have moved on and ideas need to change", she said.' 

Compassionate-Friends, Australia, Marine-Conservation-Society, Poundbakery, Bolton Bakery, mass balloon release, Keely Palin, young-horse-panicked-by-helium-balloon-suffers-broken-neck, environmental littering, MCS, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, Horse-and-Hound-Magazine,
An Australian bereavement support group - the 'Compassionate Friends' - releasing balloons on 1 February 2016 at Kingston Park Coastal Reserve

The second piece of good news comes from Australia and concerns a support group called 'The Compassionate Friends'. This group helps bereaved parents and siblings by providing opportunities for families to come together. One of TCF SA's key events is an annual balloon release. This year's event was due to be held on Sunday 23rd April.

It should be stated that TCF SA did not understand the impact of 'environmentally friendly' latex balloons until No Balloon Release Australia advised them according.

After learning the facts, a committee member of TCF SA and an organiser of the balloon release event confirmed that the group would immediately look into an environmentally friendly alternative event to replace the balloon release.

"Our information previously had been that by using supposedly biodegradable balloons, our event was safe for the environment. We're saddened to know this is not the case.

It seems we are harming the environment by releasing balloons – this is certainly not our intention - so the committee will revise the plans for the event and come up with another way to acknowledge our precious children."

Well done to all concerned.

Compassionate-Friends, Australia, Marine-Conservation-Society, Poundbakery, Bolton Bakery, mass balloon release, Keely Palin, young-horse-panicked-by-helium-balloon-suffers-broken-neck, environmental littering, MCS, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company

And finally an update on last week's Poundbakery balloon release.

Earlier today Poundbakery released the following statement via social media.

"We at Poundbakery are incredibly sorry for last week’s balloon release PR stunt. Whilst we did use biodegradable materials, we did not realise that these materials could still have such a negative impact on the environment and wildlife. We were both naive and ignorant of the devastation this can cause, which is why we would like to donate £1000 to an environmental charity. We are currently in the process of looking for a local north west based charity and will update you all when we have found the right one."

Thank you Poundbakery for listening.

Monarch / Sharm Flight Update

Yesterday - Tuesday 16th February 2016 - Monarch issued the following update regarding flights to Egypt's Sharm el-Sheikh.

* * *

"Monarch has continued to liaise closely with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO), the Department for Transport (DfT) and the UK Government over the travel advice to Sharm El Sheikh.  Whilst we are aware of the recent assessment of security procedures at Sharm El Sheikh Airport and welcome this progress, we appreciate there is further work to be done to reopen this airport to the travelling British public.  Currently, the advice from both the FCO and the DfT remains unchanged from November and advises customers against all but essential air travel to Sharm El Sheikh Airport. However, Monarch is mindful of the ongoing government level discussions to restart UK flights to Sharm El Sheikh, which could allow the Easter period to operate as planned. 

Monarch Airlines, Flights to Egypt, Flights to Sharm el-Sheikh, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company
Image Credit: London Media

As there is no change in advice at this point, Monarch has extended the cancellation of flights to and from the UK and Sharm El Sheikh Airport up to and including Thursday, 24th March 2016.   In the event that the advice does not change by next week (26th February 2016), Monarch will make further cancellations including the Easter period. It remains Monarch’s objective to operate flights to Sharm El Sheikh once approval is granted.

Customers who are affected by these cancellations are entitled to change a booking to a later date or rebook to another destination on the Monarch network. Customers can also request a credit note towards future travel or a refund.

Monarch Airlines, Flights to Egypt, Flights to Sharm el-Sheikh, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing CompanyFor customers looking for an alternative destination, Monarch has additional flights to mainland Spain, Faro, Gibraltar, Lanzarote, Fuerteventura and Tenerife. Other alternatives for a winter sun escape include the Red Sea resorts of Hurghada and Eilat and Cyprus, Agadir and Madeira. Details of these together with other suggestions for a winter holiday getaways can be found on our website.

Flight only customers can contact the Monarch Customer Contact Centre on 0333 003 0700 or email Customers who have booked a package holiday should contact Monarch on 0333 777 4744.

The safety and security of our passengers will always remain our number one priority and whilst this ongoing situation is beyond our control, Monarch would like to apologise to all affected customers for the inconvenience that it has caused."

#TBT: Dive Rite Launches World's First Helium Analyser

#ThrowBackThursday. Spring 2000 to be exact. Although Helium analysers are considered standard equipment by advanced and technical divers today, they were not always the norm. In fact until the turn of the century the only way to confirm the amount of Helium in your mix was to conduct a gas spectrometer test in a lab.

The game changer - a Helium analyser you could use in the field - was launched by Dive Rite at the January 2000 DEMA Show in Las Vegas.

Dive Rite, DEMA Show 2000, Rosemary E Lunn, Lamar Hires, Jared Hires,  DEMA Show, 990 Magazine, Roz Lunn,

Above you will find a scan of an article reporting this useful news in Issue 3, Volume 2 of 990 Magazine.

If you would like to read this edition of 990 in full, click here, and download your copy of this much missed and respected diving magazine.

990 Magazine, Ron Mahoney, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, Dive Rite, Caving In County Clare, Rigging it Right, HMS Repulse, HMS Prince of Wales, cold water regulator test, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving, rebreather diving

Rebreather Forum 3 Lecture; 'Thermal Physiology and Protection'

Rebreather Forum 3 - an international safety conference about rebreathers - was held in May 2012. Over the course of three days a number of presentations were given on many aspects of rebreather diving.

Dr Neal W Pollock, Neal Pollock, diving physiology, thermal physiology, breath hold diving, ice diving, thermal stress, DAN, Duke Dive Medicine, Divers Alert Network, Research Director, Rebreather Forum 3, RF3, Roz Lunn, Rosemary E Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, diving, scuba diving, technical diving, Fourth Element, Antarctic diving, ice diving, drysuit undergarments, thermal underwear, diving health, technical diving, HALO 3D, SITA, SITA Show, 2012 UK Diving Trade Show, Scuba Industries Trade Association

Dr Neal W Pollock, a diving physiologist from Divers Alert Network / Duke University gave a lecture on thermal physiology and protection.

Dr Neal W Pollock
9:15, Friday 18 May 2012, Boca Room III

“Diving is carried out in a wide range of environments and conditions. Thermal stress can be an important issue, particularly for the long exposures often associated with technical diving. Proper preparation can improve comfort, performance and safety. This presentation will discuss thermal stress, thermal protection, and implications for diving health.”

Dr Pollock's biography can be found here.

Photo Credit: Professor Simon J Mitchell

Memories of diving the Aeolian Sky (from A Wet Weekend in Weymouth)

The following piece is taken from an article by Rosemary E Lunn written for 990 Magazine entitled 'A Wet Weekend in Weymouth'.  (Volume 1, Issue 4, Summer 1999)

Aeolian Sky, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, TUMC, Diving PR, Diving Marketing, UK diving, Wreck diving, South coast Wreck diving, Portland diving, weymouth diving, Early on the summer of 3 November 1979 the Aeolian Sky, a 14,000 ton Greek freighter, was steaming south west of the Isle of Wight, bound for Aden.  At 04:55 a mid channel collision occurred with the 2,400 ton MV Anna Knupel, which managed to escape virtually unscathed.  The Aeolian Sky was not so lucky and radioed for assistance, reporting that she was holed in the forward number one hold and taking water. Shortly afterwards another message was sent saying that the second bulkhead had given way and that number one and number two holds were full of water with the remainder of the ship open to the sea.  It soon became apparent that she would have to be abandoned and so the crew were airlifted off.  Twenty-four miles later, after drifting unmanned in mid channel, it was decided that the Master and two crew should be airlifted aboard again, to see what could be done to rectify the situation.  She was successfully taken under tow and after four hours, land was sighted.  However the Sky was sinking at the bows and because her draught was considered too deep to safely enter Portsmouth or Southampton harbor, she was refused refuge. A decision was made to head towards Portland, but at 4.05am she sank 5 miles from St Aldhelm’s Head.

And so the myth was borne.  For the Sky was carrying quite a mixed cargo: vehicles, perfumes and sweets to name but a few goodies, and one should not overlook approximately £4,000,000 worth of Seychelles Rupees reportedly stashed in the Sickbay.  What a surprise when, a few weeks later, it was announced that divers acting for the Crown Agents, who were responsible for the money, had secretly dived the wreck searching the Sickbay for the money, to find it missing!  The Seychelles Government was not amused and cancelled the complete note issue.

Then, to add insult to injury, canisters of deadly chemicals began to be washed up in the area.  BSAC banned diving and taking of fish life between Bembridge Ledges and Portland, local fishermen were prohibited from trawling within one mile of the wreck and hundreds of dead crabs were washed up.  Weymouth and Portland began to fear the coming season would prove to be disastrous and questions were asked in the House of Commons.  Things were looking bleak for the resort.

Aeolian Sky, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, TUMC, South Coast Diving, UK Diving PR, diving out of Weymouth, diving out of Portland, South Coast Wreck Diving, 990 Magazine, Beyond the Blue Magazine
Illustration by Max Ellis, DIVER Magazine

Eventually it was established that the deadly chemicals hadn’t come from the Sky, but had been washed off the deck of another ship in mid channel.  The diving ban was lifted, summer arrived, and suddenly everyone wanted to dive the Sky.

Divers should be aware that she has been fished, and there are tangles of monofilament and ropes. The Sky is also affected by tides that can run like a train and some weird currents and irregular water movements similar to a washing machine.  A friend of mine was subjected to a most peculiar ascent two days after I had dived her.

She is, however, a most mouth-watering wreck and one does get that feeling of ‘Where do I start?’ – she is so huge.  We landed on the bridge structure and I was immediately struck by the number of cargo derricks that were casually strewn around the deck, like so many jackstraws.  Further on huge pulley blocks that had snapped off during the sinking lay scattered amongst the other debris.  Rumour has it that there are several Landrovers on the wreck.  I didn’t actually get to see any though I did spot one ex-vehicle. Quite an odd sight, 4 tyres with an engine block in the middle, and nothing else.  As I sat taking in the scene a complete meal for one wandered into view.  A lobster with a crab caught between its pincers.

Jewel Anemones, Aeolian Sky, UK wreck diving, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, Diving PR, Dive Marketing, TUMC, event management, dive shows
Image by Ian Skipworth

There's so much marine life; lots of orange shag pile carpet coating the wreck (Colonial polyp called Tubularia species indivisa, common name Oaten Pipes Hydroid), and a plethora of blushy pink Jewel Anemones.   I do like Jewel Anemones!  There was also a profusion of small flower like anemones that looked like camomile or large daisies, which splashed colour over the hulk (Devonshire Cup Coral).

The Sky is such an enormous wreck with so much to see, that one dive is definitely not enough.  She currently lies at 30 metres, so good bottom time can be pulled, especially on recreational trimix.  Personally I can’t wait to dive her again.

A Tripartisan look at the State of Rebreathers by ANDI, IANTD and TDI

The following data was announced today (Friday 19th May 2012) at Rebreather Forum 3 by Ed Betts, Brian Carney and Jo Dituri.


Rebreather Forum 3, RF3, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, Rosemary Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, Simon Mitchell, Neal Pollock, Drew Richardson, Karl Shreeves, Mark Caney, Michael Menduno, Richard Pyle, Peter Denoble, DAN, PADI, AAUS, Richard Vann, rebreather safety, ANDI, IANTD, TDI, rebreather, training, diver training, rebreather market, experience, expertise, certification, Betts, Carney, Dituri, diver certification numbers, market analysis, diving data, total number of diving certs, international association of technical dives, technical dives international,


ANDI, IANTD, TDI Collective rebreather certification numbers and market analysis

Joseph Dituri (1), Brian Carney (2), Ed Betts (3*)

* corresponding author

1. IANTD World HQ
324 St Joseph ST STE 208
Rapid City, SD 57701
(605) 721-5600
2. TDI
1045 NE Industrial Blvd
Jensen Beach, FL 34957
(207) 729-4201
74 Woodcleft Avenue
Freeport, New York 11520
(516) 546-2026



ANDI, IANTD and TDI have combined their 65+ years of collective rebreather training experience and will brief the state and future of rebreathers with detailed certification numbers. We will trend this data and provide insight into market direction. Attendance at this lecture provides you with the opportunity to speak with the leaders in rebreather training. (Ed Betts, Brian Carney and Joseph Dituri.)

Keywords: ANDI, IANTD, TDI, rebreather, training, diver training, rebreather market, experience, expertise, certification, Betts, Carney, Dituri



The three largest rebreather certification agencies came together to understand the opportunities with respect to rebreathers and foster openness as well as discuss their individual responsibilities as industry leaders in the diving community. The need for knowledge of precise rebreather certifications numbers is overdue. This paper will summarize rebreather certification numbers and analyze their trend as well as mathematically predict the future of rebreather certifications.



Primary in our minds was the validity of the data. As seems evident, there may be cross certifications between agencies. That is to say, some divers may seek certifications in two or more certification agencies which would effect the resulting certification agency’s numbers. To alleviate this, our respective agencies opened our certification files to one another. We traded all unit specific agency’s numbers. To alleviate this, our respective agencies opened our certification files to one another. We traded all unit specific certification data on rebreather training. We combined our numbers and confirmed the accuracy of the data for a statistically relevant number of years and cross checked each person by name that was certified in a geographical area, by year, unit and level of training. This process allowed each agency to personally verify numbers of certifications. From that we determined a 1% duplication effort. We then applied that duplication decrement number (γ) across all the 22 years of numerical data. All data presented represented the γ reduced data which indicates zero duplication in data. The training agencies know the units on which the training is being completed for each year. Due to potential financial implications we are not sharing unit specific information.

The resultant data was analyzed for the mean by summing the total number of certifications and dividing by the number of years, yielding the mean over the spread of years. Since the early years of rebreather certifications were very low and manufacturers were not regularly producing rebreather, the mean did not contain 1990-1995. The mean was calculated using the following equation:


Standard deviation shows how much variation or “dispersion” exists from the mean value. A high standard deviation indicates that the data points are spread out over a large range of values. Standard Deviation was calculated using the following equation:


Our three companies have slightly different methods for classifying rebreather certifications. Basic includes any entry level program to CCR’s and SCR’s as well as no stop diving and depths not greater than 30 meters. Intermediate qualifications comprises any training with minimal decompression. Advanced qualifications include dives that generate both hard and soft ceilings that are significant in nature such as trimix, cave and exploratory qualifications.

Since forecasting the market data was an important consideration, we turned to the Holt analysis. Holt’s linear exponential smoothing captures information about recent trend and time series data that is non-seasonal. For any statistical test, the probability of making a Type I error is denoted by the Greek letter alpha (α), and the probability of making a Type II error is denoted by Greek letter beta (β). Type I errors, also known as false positives, occur when you see things that are not there. Type II errors, or false negatives, occur when you don’t see things that are there (see Figure below). Alpha (α) was chosen to be 0.3 and beta (β) which was chosen to be .03. The equations are:


Lt and bt are respectively (exponentially smoothed) estimates of the level and linear trend of the series at time t, while Ft+m is the linear forecast from t forward. The group understands the Holt analysis continues to have less validity each year after projections are incorporated to determine another year of trend data. That is why the forecast was stopped after four years.


This data that reflects over 30,000 divers have been certified on 27 different types of rebreathers at varying levels from 1990-present. The mean certified per year is 1852 divers (number based only on developmental years 1996-present). The Standard Deviation is 707. Further study of the data reveals that greater than 66% of the years studied reflected a number at or greater than the mean which indicates the market is continually growing and has significant recent growth. A comparison of the SCR to CCR certifications, as shown in Figure 1, indicates a growing trend of CCR certifications although a minor resurgence is noted in SCR certifications toward the end of the data recording period.


As demonstrated in Figure 2, basic rebreather certifications (new rebreather divers) total more almost 18,000 divers. Over 12,000 divers carried on to continuing education classes on rebreathers. (50% at the intermediate level and 50% at the advanced level.) New rebreather divers are at almost an all time high in the market save a single year in 2001.


The Holt analysis projections depicted in Figure 3 indicate the market will generate between 2400 and 3100 rebreather diver certifications each year. This trend continues upward and as expected, the calculation error boundaries converge on a Holt analysis because the result calculated from one prediction is fed into the next year’s prediction. The raw data used for all calculations depicts the duplicate certifications removed and is contained in Table 1 below.

Rebreathers are a growth market. The basic rebreather divers are at a high and climbing. CCR certifications continue to grow, but we have noticed a minor resurgence of SCR in the last two years. ANDI, IANTD and TDI are three different training agencies. We have similarities and differences in the conduct of our individual businesses. Together we have a successful training methodology with 65+ years of experience. We thoroughly enjoyed working together and we will continue to work together in the future to foster openness as well as discuss our individual responsibilities as industry leaders in the diving community. While we may have minor differences as competitors, we agree on a few training items. The most important of which is that the rebreather instructor’s experience matters when choosing an instructor.


The Rough Guide to Florida. Part 1 – Filling the Tank

The lengths some people will go to, to attend Rebreather Forum 3 (  The following is taken from a blog written by Sport Diver UK writer, Martin Sampson.

Got out of the airport on Sunday and picked up the hire care. First time in a left hand drive car on the wrong side of the road for over 25 years so with some trepidation I ventured onto the highway, well turnpike actually. No I’ll stick with highway because I still haven’t got a clue what turnpike means. The first task was to get some fuel. The first gas station was a matter of yards away so I pulled onto the forecourt and read the sign on the pump saying ‘please pre-pay’. I put my credit card into the slot but the pump couldn't recognise my post code. Remove card, walk into shop, and say to the girl on the counter "please can I get some fuel?”
“How much would you like” she asked. Cue confused tourist expression.

Rebreather Forum 3, RF3, Sport Diver UK, Martin Sampson, Anglesey Divers, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, Rosemary Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, Simon Mitchell, Neal Pollock, Drew Richardson, Karl Shreeves, Mark Caney, Michael Menduno, Richard Pyle, Peter Denoble, DAN, PADI, AAUS, Richard Vann, rebreather safety“I don’t know” I replied, “I want to fill up so I don’t know how much it will take”.

“Well you can leave your card, fill up and then pay” she said helpfully, oblivious to the fact that she was helping a simple process get complicated.

I walk out to the pump, lift the nozzle and waited. Nothing. After two mins I walk back into the shop. “What am I doing wrong?” I asked.

“Are you waiting for gas?” she asked still sounding delightfully helpful.

“Er... yes”.

She pressed a button on the touch screen in front of her, “Ok the pump’s on now”.

Back out to the pump and 'Hey Presto' I fill the tank up. Back to the shop again to pay.  She hands me back my card which I dutifully slide into the card reader.
“Mileage please”, she asks.

“Eh?” Looking down at the card reader the word ‘odometer’ was displayed. Why did the credit card company need to know the mileage? Was it that, by some conspiracy, that the car rental company had informed Google, who had informed Mastercard that I was on the road?

“I’ll be back in a moment”, I shot out of the shop, ran to the car and opened the door. The steering wheel had been stolen – er no, wrong bloody side. Run round to other side. Look at the odometer which is digital. The ignition needed to be on. Where are the keys? In the shop. Bugger!  Back to shop looking flustered. Grab keys, run to car, get mileage, run back. The transaction had timed out and my card was lying on the counter and another guy was now paying for fuel, coffee, muffins, and who knows what else.

“45657, 45657, 45657,” I started muttering to myself, willing myself not to forget the number. By now the bloke with the muffins thinks I'm cracked.  At last! Card in slot, mileage?.............45657........YeeeeeSS!

“Driver number”.

Driver number? What the f... is a driver number?

The girl shrugged her shoulders.

“Can you tell I’ve only just arrived in the USA?” Rough translation: “please help me out here because I haven’t got a clue what’s going on”.

“I don’t know” said the girl doing her level best to be nauseatingly helpful.

“Well I’ll just make one up shall I?”


“I’ll tell you what, I’ll just try my pin number”

I type in four numbers and........the transaction goes through.

Back to the car, and I sit in the drivers seat.......exhausted.

“Where’s the bloody steering wheel?”
Oh no not again.

Finally, sat in the right seat I gave the gas station a cheery wave goodbye. I didn’t actually want to do that but my right hand was flapping around trying to find the seat belt. That's on the left stupid. Meanwhile, my left leg was in spasm trying to find the clutch. Oh didn’t I say? They drive automatics out here.

Rebreather Forum 3 Speakers

Rebreather Forum 3 Speakers - Friday 18th May 2012
Caribbean Ballroom III, Caribe Royale Convention Center


Dr Drew Richardson, PADI, Professional Association of Diving Instructors, Rebreather Forum 3 Speaker, TUMC, The Underwater Marketing Company, Rosemary E Lunn, Rosemary Lunn, Roz Lunn, Rebreather Forum 2.0, Rubicon Foundation, Rebreather Forum 2.0 Conference Proceedings





Dr Drew Richardson

07:30 Rebreather Forum 3 Welcome
15:00 Rebreather Forum 3 Orientation



Michael Menduno, Rebreather Forum 3 Speaker, RF3, Lessons learned from Rebreather Forum 2, Rosemary E Lunn, Rosemary Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, TUMC, aquCORPS magazine, technical diving, diving conference,





Michael Menduno

15:15 Lessons Learned from Rebreather Forum 2



Richard Harris, Harry Harris, Rebreather Forum 3 Speaker, RF3, cave diving, cave diver, Australian, Rosemary E Lunn, Rosemary Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, TUMC, anaesthetist, physician, Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine, Royal Adelaide Hospital





Dr Richard 'Harry' Harris

16:30 Rebreathers - Overcoming Obstacles in Exploration



Martin Robson, Rebreather Forum 3 Speaker, RF3, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, Rosemary Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, TUMC, Christian McDonald, Evan Kovacs, Mark Caney, Phil Short, Lamar Hires, CCR communities





Martin Robson

17:20 CCR Communities

"RF3 is the premier worldwide CCR event" states Tony Davis

Tony Davis, Aqua Tech Australia, CCR Technologies, Dive Rite Australia, The Underwater Marketing Company, TUMC, Roz Lunn, Rosemary Lunn, Rosemary E Lunn, RF3, Rebreather Forum 3, CCR physiology, Simon Mitchell, Petar Denoble, Neal PollockTony Davis, CEO of Aqua Tech Australia & CCR Technologies is flying in from down under to attend RF3.  We asked him why.

“When I read the agenda I knew I had to attend.  RF3 is the premier worldwide CCR event, and I want to learn more about the CCR’s I distribute in Australia, whilst making business contacts to grow the CCR component of my company. I also want to learn more about CCR specific physiology, and the business of CCR’s in recreational diving.”

The three day programme is divided into sessions to cover different aspects of rebreathers.   Topics up for discussion include;

- Hazard Analysis and Human Factors
- CO2 Scrubber Technology
- CO2 Sensors
- O2 Sensors and O2 Control
- Pre-Market Testing
- Post-Market Monitoring
- Post-Incident Testing
- Semi-Closed Systems
- Operations and Training

If you want to join Tony, book your tickets now by logging onto and be part of this key rebreather event.