TEKDiveUSA.2014 Attendees To Receive A PADI Rebreather Checklist

PADI (Professional Association of Diving Instructors) has today confirmed that TEKDiveUSA.2014 attendees will receive a 'Type T' rebreather checklist in their conference bag.

PADI_Rebreather Checklist_RF3_Rebreather Forum 3_Dr Drew Richardson_Christian McDonald_AAUS_DAN_Dr Petar Denoble_Dr Neal W Pollock_Dr Richard D Vann_Rosemary E Lunn_Roz Lunn_The Underwater Marketing Company_TEKDiveUSA_EUROTEK_RF3 Consensus Statements_safety_rebreathers_checklists_Mark Caney_Karl Shreeves_scuba diving
PADI 'Type T' Rebreather / CCR Checklist

Two years ago this month PADI, along with the AAUS and DAN, hosted Rebreather Forum 3. This three day safety symposium was convened to address major issues surrounding rebreather technology, and its application in commercial, media, military, scientific, sport and technical diving. Experts, manufactures, instructor trainers, training agencies and divers from all over the world discussed this technology and shared information.

The programme included dedicated sessions covering topics such as medicine and physiology, closed circuit rebreather (CCR) orientation, business and operations, CCR familiarization, training, design and testing, and incident analysis.

Associate Professor Simon J Mitchell chaired the final session at RF3 and, as a result, 16 key consensus statements were agreed and ratified by the global rebreather community. You can hear this presentation by clicking here.

Two of the 16 consensus statements agreed at Rebreather Forum 3 concerned the use of checklists. RF3 acknowledged the overwhelming evidence demonstrating the efficacy of checklists in preventing errors and two recommendations were made. These are listed below.



The forum acknowledged the overwhelming evidence demonstrating the efficacy of checklists in preventing errors in parallel fields that share similar technical complexity. Two recommendations regarding checklists were consequently agreed:


The forum recommends that rebreather manufacturers produce carefully designed checklists, which may be written and / or electronic, for use in the pre-dive preparation  (unit assembly and immediate pre-dive) and post-dive management of their rebreathers.

– Written checklists should be provided in a weatherproof or waterproof form.

– The current version of these checklists annotated with the most recent revision date should be published on the manufacturer’s website


The forum recommends that training agencies and their instructors embrace the crucial leadership role in fostering a safety culture in which the use of checklists by rebreather divers becomes second nature.




The forum applauds and endorses the release of pooled data describing numbers of rebreather certifications by training agencies, and encourages other agencies to join ANDI, IANTD, and TDI in this initiative


The forum endorses the concept of making minimum rebreather training standards available in the public arena.


The forum endorses the concept of a currency requirement for rebreather instructors. We recommend that training agencies give consideration to currency standards in respect of diving activity, class numbers, and unit specificity for their instructors.


The forum recognizes and endorses the industry and training agency initiative to characterize “recreational” and “technical” streams of sport rebreather diver training. These groups will have different operational, training and equipment needs.




The forum recommends that training agencies provide rebreather divers  with a simple list of instructions that will mitigate common errors in evidence preservation after a serious incident or rebreather fatality.

– These instructions will be developed under the auspices of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society Diving Committee in consultation with the relevant RF3 presenters.


The forum endorses the concept of a widely notified centralized “on-call” consultation service to help investigators in avoiding errors or omissions in the early stages of a rebreather accident investigation, and to facilitate referral to expert investigative services.


The forum recommends that in investigating a rebreather fatality the principal accident investigator invite the manufacturer of the incident rebreather (or other relevant equipment) to assist with its evaluation (including the crucial task of data download) as early as is practicable.


The forum endorses the DAN worldwide initiative to provide a means of on-line incident reporting with subsequent analysis and publication of incident root causes.




The forum recommends that all rebreathers incorporate data logging systems which record functional parameters relevant to the particular unit and dive data, and which allow download of these data. Diagnostic reconstruction of dives with as many relevant parameters as possible is the goal of this initiative.

– Footnote: An ideal goal would be to incorporate redundancy in data logging systems, and as much as practical, to standardize the data to be collected


The forum endorses the need for third party pre-market testing to establish that rebreathers are fit for purpose. Results of a uniform suite of practically important unmanned testing parameters such as canister duration, and work of breathing (qualified by clear statements of experimental parameters) should be reported publicly. Ideally, this testing should be to an internationally recognized standard.


The forum acknowledges recent survey data indicating a poor understanding of rebreather operational limits in relation to depth and carbon dioxide scrubber duration among trained users, and therefore recommends:

1. that training organizations emphasize these parameters in training courses.

2. that manufacturers display these parameters in places of prominence in device documentation and on websites.


The forum strongly endorses industry initiatives to improve oxygen measurement technologies, and advocates consideration of potentially beneficial emerging strategies such as dynamic validation of cell readings and alternatives to galvanic fuel cells.


The forum identifies as a research question the issue of whether a mouthpiece retaining strap would provide protection of the airway in an unconscious rebreather diver.


The forum identifies as a research question the efficacy of a full face masks for use with sport rebreathers.


What's Rebreather Forum 3 all about? Neal W Pollock explains

“The main aim of RF3 is to evaluate the state of the art”, stated Dr Neal W Pollock, DAN’s Research Director and one of the organisers behind RF3.  “In a nutshell the theme of RF3 is to improve understanding, which we hope will translate to improved safety across the board.  We can always do things better.  So it is a rationality check to see if we can make things safer.

Rebreather Forum 3, RF3, Rubicon Foundation, DAN, Divers Alert Network, Research Director, Neal W Pollock, Neal Pollock, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, AAUS, PADI, Rebreather safety, Simon Mitchell, Jill Heinerth, APD, Ambient Pressure Diving, Martin Parker, Cognitas, Incident reporting, diving safety, BSAC Incident ReportWe’re therefore going to assess the current situation re manufacturing, testing, training and diving protocols to check that we are doing this as safely as we can, and highlight areas that need improving so that we can move forward.  Hence we’ve convened this Conference to put a lot of opinions into the room, rather than relying on a set of interpretations from one particular organization or company.  Doing it this way allows us to pull together all the different views and we then analyse the results through one lens.

The training agencies all say we are doing it right, so therefore why do we still have a number of fatalities every year?  At RF3 we intend to be as honest as we can about issues and address every one of them.  This may sound to some divers that we are suggesting current standards are dangerous.  We are not.  Our ethos is more along the lines of ‘how can we do it better and safer’?

So why will RF3 be useful to the Industry?  When you understand where something is failing; be it manufacturing, training or diving protocols, then everyone benefits from knowing how failures can occur.  Then we can see and evaluate how to successfully improve performance.”

You can be part of this important peer review, just log onto www.rf30.org, check out the agenda and book your tickets to the most significant rebreather conference this decade; Rebreather Forum 3.  You’ll kick yourself if you miss it!

Going underground at TEKCamp 2012

With preparations for TEKCamp 2012 moving ahead at full speed, details are leaking out about what promises to be a bigger and better event than ever before!

Kicking off on the 9th July, TEKCamp 2012 will see attendees getting involved in a range of exciting activities and talks. The highlight of the event promises to be an exclusive ‘out of hours’ field trip to the amazing show caves at Wookey Hole with CDG cave diver, Dr Duncan Price. Duncan will be taking TEKCamp attendees on a fascinating history of cave diving in Wookey as they explore these world-class show caves for themselves. Prepare to be gob-smacked by the breath-taking beauty of these amazing caves - but watch out for the Wookey witch!

TEKCamp, Rich Walker, Vobster Quay, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, Mark Powell, Paul Toomer, Martin Robson, Phil Short, Duncan Price, Wookey Hole, skills, buoyancy control, D-SMB, British diving, UK Diving, diving skills, Kevin Gurr, rebreathersTEKCamp 2012 is a unique opportunity to 'speed date' ten of the UK's foremost technical diving instructors at Vobster Quay in Somerset. Over five solid days, attendees will participate in a series of in-water skills development and coaching sessions, lectures and talks - all designed to give divers a unique opportunity to develop and improve their diving skills and knowledge under the guidance and coaching of some of the UK's foremost technical instructors. Some of the biggest names in technical diving will be giving attendees the benefit of their considerable knowledge - names already committed to the event include Martin Robson, Phil Short, Paul Toomer, Rich Walker and Mark Powell.

For recreational and budding technical divers alike, TEKCamp 2012 offers a unique opportunity to improve your skills and increase your diving confidence under the direct guidance of some of the UK's foremost technical instructors. Buoyancy control need work? Finning technique less than efficient? Wish you could pop up a DSMB mid-water without losing control? TEKCamp 2012 will fine tune these skills and more...

Attendees can look forward to a packed schedule of talks throughout the week covering a broad range of diving subjects. The talks schedule is still being finalised but attendees can already look forward to...

• MONDAY 9TH - Acclaimed cave diver John Volanthen will be presenting a fascinating talk on the expedition to dive the cave system at Pozo Azul in Spain. John and other team members managed to set a new record for the worlds longest cave diving penetration, covering a distance of over 9 km!

• TUESDAY 10TH - Ever-popular rebreather cave expert Phil Short will be headlining Tuesday evening. Phil will be giving a talk entitled '20 Years in Diving: The good, the bad and the ugly'. If Phil's previous talks are anything to go by, this one is sure to be packed with seat-of-your-pants anecdotes and humour!

• WEDNESDAY 11TH - Fancy a field trip? On Wednesday night, TEKCamp attendees will be heading down to Wookey Hole for a guided tour of the stunning show caves lead by none other than CDG explorer, Dr Duncan Price. This promises to be the highlight of the week so don't miss out!

TEKCamp, Vobster Quay, Duncan Price, Wookey Hole, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, Phil Short, Kevin Gurr, Rich Walker, Mark Powell, Martin Robson, diving skills, twinset course, stage handling, DSMB deployment, line laying, tech rescue

• THURSDAY 12TH - Pioneering technical diver and rebreather guru Kevin Gurr will be returning to TEKCamp 2012 to give another fabulous talk. Marking the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic, Kevin will be taking attendees on a journey to the world’s most famous wreck. Recounting his own dive to the RMS Titanic onboard the MIR submersible, wreck dives don’t get much bigger than this!

• FRIDAY 13TH - Friday night is party night at TEKCamp 2012 will a celebratory hog roast to mark the end of another very successful event. The instructing team will be in attendance, giving attendees the opportunity to rub shoulders and chat with some of the biggest names in diving. We'll also be running our raffle with prizes galore up for grabs!

Tickets for TEKCamp 2012 are selling fast with over 80% already snapped up but there's still time to get yours. Two ticket options are available offering either five or nine training sessions over the course of five days. For more information on booking options, visit www.tekcamp.co.uk

Are we there yet? Rebreather technology for recreational divers by Dr Petar Denoble

RF3, Rebreather Forum 3, Karl Shreeves, Richard Pyle, TUMC, The  Underwater Marketing Company, Roz Lunn, Rosemary E Lunn, Neal Pollock, Drew Richardson, Kevin Gurr, Phil Short, Jill Heinerth, Martin Parker, APD, Petar Denoble, Richard Vann, Rebreather Forum 2, Michael Menduno, Yochanan I. Daskalovic, DAN, PADI, AAUS, Douglas Ebersole,

"In the future, you'll simply jump into your car, turn on the Internet, turn on a movie and sit back and relax and turn on the automatic pilot, and the car will drive itself," says Michiko Kaku in his book Physics of the Future. "Unlike a human driver, it doesn't get drunk, it doesn't get distracted and certainly does not have road rage."

Even though driverless cars are not yet commercially available, driving a car is a simple process with all of the complex technology hidden from the user. Today's rebreather technology is a few steps behind, but it may be catching up.

Sixteen years ago diving scientists, manufacturers, divers, training agencies and regulators met for three days at Rebreather Forum 2.0 (RF2.0), in Redondo Beach, Calif., to discuss the future of "sport rebreather diving." At the time, at least one dozen rebreather models had appeared on the market, some of which were there to stay. The market was minuscule, and training opportunities were practically nonexistent. The consumer base consisted of about 100 brave, knowledgeable divers who recognized they could achieve more in their respective fields using rebreathers but at the cost of more work, money and risk than average divers were ready to commit.

RF2.0 reviewed the physiology of rebreather diving and the enabling technology, including the risks and needed enhancements if sport rebreather diving became popular. The findings and recommendations of RF2.0 emphasized the complexity of closed-circuit rebreathers (CCR), a need for technical support and better control of insidious risks including hypoxia, hyperoxia and hypercapnia. Additional safety issues were also noted such as a "caustic cocktail," an unanticipated variation in the partial pressure of nitrogen, thermal considerations and mechanical or electronic failures. Some technological advances were explicitly required, like full-face masks to prevent drowning in case of unconsciousness and an on-board carbon dioxide monitor to prevent carbon dioxide poisoning. Third party pre-marketing testing was advised, but standards were not proposed.

When compared to open-circuit scuba, rebreathers required significant ongoing maintenance and support to function properly; the consensus among the forum attendees was that rebreathers were suited for the technically savvy rather than the average diver. Military divers have successfully managed the risks of using rebreathers with resources not available in sport diving, including the use of a large supporting infrastructure, a high degree of discipline and extensive formal training.

Changing Tides: RF2.0 to RF3

Dr. Richard Pyle describes the experience of a self-taught rebreather diver best: "After my first 10 hours on a rebreather, I was a real expert. Another 40 hours of dive time later, I considered myself a novice. When I had completed about 100 hours of rebreather diving, I realized I was only just a beginner."

He did, however, provide a few survival tips for new rebreather divers:

    1. Know your partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) at all times; do not trust "fail-safe electronics."
    2. Learn, in depth, diving physics and physiology.
    3. Training should emphasize failure detection, manual control and bailout procedures.
    4. Cover your ass (have a back-up).

The experiences and tips of Dr. Pyle and his peers became the basis for development of formal training for technical rebreather divers.

But there were additional challenges for the trainers. According to Karl Shreeves, technical development executive for PADI worldwide, before the training agency could consider the instructional system, it was necessary to determine who the customers would be and how they would use rebreathers. PADI considered rebreather diving a niche not of interest to mainstream recreational divers at the time, but recognized the trend could change at any point. Indeed, a lot has changed; rebreather technology has improved, some training agencies have started offering instruction and the number of users has increased from hundreds to tens of thousands.

The fatalities have also risen accordingly to more than 20 per year, or more than 190 in the sixteen years since RF2.0. Not all of these fatalities were rebreather-specific, but all analyses indicate operator-machine interaction played a major role in it. It's an interaction that must be acknowledged, understood and made as safe as possible. Dietmar Luchtenberg of Europe's Rebreather Advisory Board said, "We can't get rid of safety issues in rebreather diving by [only] increasing technology standards." He emphasized the need and challenge of eliminating the factor of human error to enhance diver safety. After RF2.0, there was also a consensus about the significance of the human factor in the safety of rebreathers; the suggested approach seemed to be to develop a reasonably safe device and shift the residual risk to the users.

The full article is available here at AlertDiverOnline, the magazine for Divers Alert Network

Mark Powell Steps Into RF3

Mark Powell, renowned author of ‘Deco for Divers’, (the award winning guide to decompression theory) and one of the UK’s leading technical diving instructors, has booked his ticket for Rebreather Forum 3.  A diver since 1987, Mark has a passion for wreck diving.  We asked him why he is attending RF3.

Mark Powell, Rebreather Forum 2, Rebreather Forum 3, Michael Menduno, Deco for Divers, EUROTEK, Richard Pyle, Jill Heinerth, Petar Denoble, Neal W Pollock, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, rebreather conference“When Rebreather Forum 2 was held in 1996 it was one of the most influential events in the development of technical diving.  I’m therefore expecting RF3 to be even more significant event. The opportunity to get so many divers, instructors, manufacturers and experts together in one place is invaluable. The rebreather industry is at a critical point in its development. Lessons have been learned regarding training, operations and design of units and I expect RF3 to consolidate these lessons and set the direction for the way rebreather diving develops over the next few years”.

What are you looking to get out of Rebreather Forum 3 Mark?

“My main goal is to meet as many people as possible and learn as much as I can. Simon Mitchell is a ‘must see’ as his talks are always entertaining and incredibly insightful and I also want to listen to Jill Heinerth and Richard Pyle. The safety and decompression workshops are the ones I most want to attend and I will definitely be looking forward to the talks by David Doolette, Petar Denoble, Andrew Fock and Bill Stone.

This conference promises to be a lot of fun as well.  Whenever divers get together we love to talk and the Beach BBQ Loud Shirt Party on the Friday night sounds intriguing. And if the Gala Banquet on the Saturday night measures up to that at EUROTEK I know we’ll be in for a cracking evening.  If you’re serious about your diving, why would you not attend RF3?!”

Book now for Rebreather Forum 3

For anyone with an interest in rebreather technology and science, Rebreather Forum 3 (RF3) is an unmissable occasion. With all the major players attending, this is the perfect opportunity for you to get up to speed with current thinking in rebreather technology, from the industry's foremost minds.

RF3 (www.rf30.org) will be held from Friday 18th to Sunday 20th May 2012 inclusive at the Caribe Royale Hotel, Orlando. This unique conference comprises two elements; 30 different talks delivered by a team of respected speakers over three days and a specialist Expo with more than 30 international exhibitors.

Rebreather Forum 3, Drew Richardson, Michael Menduno, Kim Smith, Kiss Rebreathers, Martin Robson, Petar Denoble, Andrew Fock, David Concannon, Peter Sieniewicz, Bill Stone, John Clarke, Arne Sieber, Jeff Bozanic, Kevin Gurr, Dan Warkander, Bruce Partridge, Gavin Anthony, Mike Ward, Martin Parker, David Cowgill, Oskar Franberg, Phil Short, Dave Pence, Jill Heinerth, Terrance Tysall, Neal W. Pollock, Simon Mitchell, CO2 Sensors, O2 Sensors, O2 Control, Scrubber technology, RESA, Rebreather Education & Safety Association, Rebreather Forum 2, Thermal Physiology and protection, thermal stress, CCR physiology, CCR diving fatalities, decompression methods, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, ANDI, TDI, IANTD, DAN, AAUS, DAN, Divetech Cayman, Nancy Easterbrook, Steve Lewis, Bruce Partridge, Richie Kohler, Richard Pyle, US CoastguardIt's 16 years since the previous Rebreather Forum and there is much to discuss. Major issues will be addressed surrounding rebreather technology, and its application in sport, military, research and scientific diving. RF3 has two key objectives; an emphasis on safety and the much needed peer review of the state of the art. As a RF3 delegate you will be part of this important process.

The social side has not been forgotten either, whenever divers get together they like to talk and in the up and coming months you can follow us on Twitter; #RebreatherF3 or Facebook. On Friday night there will be a Loud Shirt Party - a Beach BBQ extravaganza - ideal for catching up with friends and colleagues, meanwhile on Saturday night we celebrate success at the glamorous and sophisticated RF3 Gala Banquet.

Although rebreather diving is a niche market, it is not without influence and it’s actively expanding. We are now entering a new age of diving. In the last couple of years we've seen major steps forward with the recent launch of two recreational machines. The ‘Type R’ rebreather is coming of age and the training agencies are actively working with manufacturers to grow this significant new market.

Attending Rebreather Forum 3 gives you unrivalled access to the very latest in rebreather training, technology and ethos, delivered by some of the world's significant figures in the field. It’s not often that you will get the opportunity to meet and talk to these cutting edge leading professionals who shape and influence this industry.

Delegates will therefore be pleased to hear that there are "Early Bird Specials" on RF3 Tickets until 1st February 2012, with savings of up to US$100 per ticket. With RF3 tickets starting from US$290, log onto www.rf30.org now to book your place at this decade’s most momentous rebreather event. Regardless of your experience level, Rebreather Forum 3 is not to be missed.

Technical Training to enjoy a renaissance as IANTD UK changes ownership

Following an 18 month hiatus, the UK franchise of IANTD (International Association of Nitrox and Technical Divers) has been bought by the dream team behind the revitalised Vobster Quay - Martin and Amy Stanton.

“In the early 90’s when Kevin Gurr set up IANTD UK, it was the first technical diver training agency in Europe”, stated Martin Stanton, Director of IANTD UK.  “We’re therefore genuinely excited that the mantle is now passing to us.  We’d like to thank Kevin Evans and Simon Watton for caretaking the agency since 2008, and wish them well in future projects.  Now we’re in for a very exciting time because currently IANTD UK (www.iantd.uk.com) is in a very good position to grow and expand.  After all virtually every experienced diver and instructor in the UK has done an IANTD training course at some point in their career.

Whilst this announcement doesn’t immediately seem to be that important to ‘the diver in the sea’, it’s of more significance to the UK Dive Shops and Training Centres.  “From today we delighted to announce fulltime superior support ensuring same day despatch of materials, efficient processing of qualification cards and high Quality Assurance. 

We know that at the end of the day a good course primarily comes down to the quality of the Instructor rather than the Agency.  A good way of demonstrating this is by looking at Mark Powell (TDI), Phill Short (IANTD) and Rich Walker (GUE) in the water - there’s not much to tell them apart.  So get a well trained experienced instructor and you gain so much more from your course.  Hence it’s very important to us that we focus on high Quality Assurance and Training, delivering from the top downwards.  Consequently we’re delighted to announce that Phill Short will be the new UK Training Director whose remit will include Standards of Training”.

“As an Instructor, Instructor Trainer and Instructor Trainer Trainer who has maintained loyalty to one Technical Agency throughout my career - IANTD - I’m honoured that Tom Mount and Joe Dituri have asked me to be involved with the new management team at IANTD UK”, stated Phill Short.  “I was very lucky to be introduced to the world of Technical Diving and the diving opportunities it could offer me by Kevin Gurr.  Over the years I’ve gained experience through teaching, and knowledge on further instructor courses and diving on many cave and wreck expeditions. I also consider myself fortunate that I’ve been trained and evaluated as a Cave Instructor by Tom Mount.

Being appointed UK Training Director and work alongside Martin Stanton is very exciting because it gives me the perfect opportunity to share some of the incredible things I’ve learnt over the last fifteen years.  I very much look forward to raising the quality training bar with my colleagues to help create safer and better educated divers at all levels”. 

IANTD UK can be contacted by email on info@iantd.uk.com or telephone 0845 644 0635.

Press Coverage includes;

DiveLife, Manchester’s premier Scuba Centre has moved and expanded

It’s the sport that so many of you have always wanted to do, but have just never got around to it.  Perhaps you tried it on holiday and loved it, but never thought you could do a course and get qualified. Or you’ve learnt overseas but never considered you could happily do it in theUK.  “It” of course is Scuba Diving.

Interest in scuba diving continues to grow and you can understand why when watching incredible marine life courtesy of the BBC’s Blue Planet.  With the Red Sea Riviera now a leading economical sunshine destination, more and more holiday makers are having their own ‘Blue Planet moment’ snorkelling the beautiful Egyptian waters. A fact that has impacted in a positive way on Whitefield based DiveLife (www.divelife.co.uk).

Less than four years ago DiveLife was a brand new dive centre. Today the shop on Bury New Road has been outgrown, hence the relocation to bigger premises just a 100 yards away around the corner behind the Beehive Pub. 

“At DiveLife we all have a passion for diving, and this is what DiveLife is all about”, explained Owner Brett Thorpe. “I guess this is probably why we’ve grown so quickly. Although we’re a young company, we do have a lot of ‘real diving’ experience. If you take the shop staff for instance, we’ve got 62 years of diving knowledge between the 6 of us, so we really do know about scuba diving and understand it’s such a cool sport.  Learning to dive can really change your life and we’ve had people who’ve tried it on holiday come to us to do to their PADI Open Water Course.  Because they love the sports so much, they’ve now swapped their pin-striped suit for a rubber one and become professional instructors, which means they can teach diving anywhere in the World”.

It’s a less well known fact that you don’t have to travel far to experience good diving. We’re lucky in the UK that our diving can be pretty awesome because of our rich and varied marine life. We’re also a maritime nation which means we’ve got unique opportunities to dive with mischievous seals, majestic basking sharks, and historical wrecks such as the German High Seas Fleet. Overtime these wrecks evolve into artificial reefs and get covered in a myriad of life including all sorts of anemones. The sheer opulence and richness of Jewel Anemones are completely unexpected and beautiful to look at and enjoy. Vibrant oranges, gaudy pinks and brilliant Forget-me-not blues that turn purple when a torch beam hits them, which is why so many British divers think that UK diving is some of the very best in the World.

Learning to dive isn’t difficult, but as with anything worth being serious about, you’ll need to invest some time and effort. Compared with other adventure sports it’s also relatively inexpensive. To take part you don’t need to be able to swim that well, just need to be in good health and be reasonably comfortable in the water. When it comes to courses, in Britain there are half a dozen dive training agencies, and one of the most popular is the Professional Association of Diving Instructors and their Open Water Course.  This is an internationally recognised diving qualification so it’s no surprise that many people begin their exciting journey into the Underwater World by visiting their local PADI Dive Centre. 

“We’re a PADI 5 Star Instructor Development Centre”, grinned Brett Thorpe.   “This is awarded to a dive centre that consistently achieves the highest standard of instruction.  Since we opened in Spring 2006, we’ve proudly trained and issued over 1,500 diving qualifications.  So if this is something that you’ve always wanted to do, why not come along and have a go. Twice a week we have a Scuba Experience night, and this is where complete beginners have the opportunity of doing a pool dive with one of our instructors. At £25 we’ve found this to be a very popular present for Christmas, Birthdays, or as a special treat, because it’s exciting, different and a unique experience. It’s really great to see each person surface after their dive with a big grin on their face saying “it’s the best thing I’ve ever done”.

You’ll be in safe hands at DiveLife because we have a strong and diverse professional instructional team with our male and female instructors ranging in age from 20 to 55.  Every one of us believes in developing their own personal diving knowledge since it provides the very best services to our customers. This means that if at any time someone needs some extra tuition for instance, we are able to help and support them.

This ethos is also carried over into our premises, because we know that divers want a fully inventoried shop containing only the very best brands.  It’s one of the reasons we grew out of Bury New Road because we can now stock all kinds and sizes of kit that enables us to give good quality equipment counselling. We’re very near to Junction 17 on the M60, so why not drop by for a cup of tea and see what DiveLife and our new shop is all about. At this time of year we often get requests for help from friends and family of divers popping in to buy them something, so please ask if you want some advice. We’ve got loads of free car parking, which makes looking for your first mask, fins and snorkel easy. And for those divers who have not discovered us yet, it doesn’t matter if you enjoy single cylinder diving, prefer a twinset, dive a Rebreather or just want to know more about snorkelling and diving, we would be delighted to help you get more out of scuba diving. It can be your passport to changing your life”.