With 23 Years Of Hindsight – Rigging Options For Diving

A recent post on a diving forum stated "sidemounting is just a fad".

New(er) divers to the sport could be forgiven for thinking this style of scuba diving is a recent phenomenon.

Cave Photography, Gavin Newman, Mike Thomas, Cave Diving Group, CDG 50th Anniversary, Wookey Hole, Drager Dolphin rebreather, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company
Two Brit Cave Divers marking the CDG's 50th Anniversary by diving Wookey Hole, June 1996 Photo Credit: Gavin Newman

Sidemounting was actually invented in the 1960s by the Brits. They were exploring sites such as Wookey Hole, Swildons Cave and other underground systems, and would often find 'the way on' was blocked by a submerged passageway called a sump. In order to explore further, these sumps needed to be navigated.

British sumps tend to be short, cramped, flooded passageways, therefore buoyancy is not an issue nor is the use of fins. Cavers just needed a means to be able to breath and (sometimes) see where they were pushing. The caver would attach a cylinder and regulator to their body using a robust belt that allowed the cylinder to be worn against the body. This 'English system' of cylinder rigging allowed the explorer to crawl through both dry and wet sections of cave and keep on pushing the system.

During the 1970s the 'English system' was adopted across the pond by Floridian cave divers. These cave systems tended to be properly flooded with the emphasis on diving to explore the cave. Buoyancy, trim and propulsion became an issue, hence cylinders were moved from the waist / thigh area, up towards the armpit and against the torso.  Once again, these divers made their own rigging system. However it wasn't until the mid 1990s that the first commercial sidemount diving system was manufactured by Dive Rite. This was designed by Lamar Hires, a renowned cave explorer and instructor. 

The following article by Michael Menduno is reprinted from the pioneering American journal for technical diving, aquaCORPS, V4, MIX, January-February 1992.

Though double (twinset) tanks and stage bottles are generally a requirement for most technical diving operations, diving sets vary significantly depending on the specific application and diving environment. Here’s a look at some of the more common methods of set rigging as practiced today in the “doubles community.”

Squeezing By - authored by Lamar Hires

Lamar Hires, Jared Hires, Lee Ann Hires, Bob Janowski, Michael Menduno, aquaCORPS Magazine, Dive Rite, sidemount diving, technical diving, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, XRay Magazine
A Floridian sidemount rig from the early 1990's, before Dive Rite released their TransPac system Image Credit: Bob Janowski

Originally developed for the tight low visibility sump diving that is common in Europe, sidemounts allowed spelunkers to more easily transport single cylinders through a dry cave to the dive site. In North Florida, the use of sidemount techniques has allowed exploration into small silty areas that were once thought impassable and has opened up entire new cave systems that were simply inaccessible with back mounted doubles.

Sidemounts reduce the strain of carrying heavy doubles up steep inclines, lowering cylinders down into a hole, and making those long walks through the woods to the dive site. Cave systems known to be silty can now be penetrated without heavy silting. Sidemount configuration means wearing the cylinders on the hips instead of the back. The cylinders are fastened in the middle with a snap to a harness at the waist. The necks are clipped off at the armpit using bungee material (a bicycle inner tube is preferred) so that the cylinders are forced to lay parallel to the diver’s body. Adjustments are usually needed at first to insure a snug comfortable fit.

When diving with sidemounts, gas supplies must be balanced for adequate reserves throughout the dive. The regulator and SPG hoses no longer lay across the back and instead are clipped across the chest area. The management of these is critical for proper monitoring of gas supplies and switching regulators during the dive. Back-up and emergency equipment must be streamlined and tucked away to achieve the desired profile—no thicker than two cylinders that lay along the diver’s hips.

Clearly, sidemount diving is not for everyone because of the potential hazards that exist; low visibility, line traps and squeezes that seem to get smaller and smaller are only a few of the obstacles to be overcome. A diver must be totally comfortable in all these conditions before considering sidemount as an alternative. Suitably equipped, divers who are, can usually find a way to squeeze by.

China Cult - authored by Billy Deans 

Billy Deans, Joel Silverstein, Michael Menduno, aquaCORPS Magazine, SS Andrea Doria, Poseidon, doubles, twinset, technical diving, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, XRay Magazine,
Technical diving pioneer and educator Billy Deans Image Credit: Joel Silverstein

Previously isolated from the underground and fellow wreckers to the south, the east coast wreck diving community evolved its own style of set rigging suitable for the cold dark waters of the north and the available technology. Still seen on the boats that work the Doria, Texas Tower, the Virginia and the San Diego, a typical east coast wreck diving set consists of a pair of double 80s or 95s (10.5 or 11.5 liter) or secured to a large capacity BCD jacket with a manifold system, or commonly two independent regulators, which are rotated throughout the dive.

A 40cf (5.5 liter) pony mounted between the doubles serves as a bailout, along with a handmade upreel (hemp rope wrapped around a forearm-length aluminum spindle). For the most part, stage bottles, typically air, are something divers leave tied off to the anchor line at 10ft (3m), and oxygen for decompression is still used sparingly, if at all.

Now with the advent of larger tanks, harness and manifold systems, improved decompression methods and mix technology, all that is changing. Today, a well-outfitted high tech wreck diver carries a pair of cold-filled Genesis 120s (14.5 liter) with DIN crossover manifold and valve protectors, shoulder mounted stage bottles, or ‘wing tanks’, containing decompression gas (EAN and or oxygen)—do you really want to bet your tissues on that cylinder clipped off to the anchor line? Harness, bag and back plate system, argon inflation system and of course an upreel.

The result? Wreck divers are staying down longer, getting more of that first class china, and most importantly are doing it safer. After all, when you come right down to it, the most valuable artifact that you’ll ever bring home is yourself.

To read the full article, click here

First Published: X-Ray MagazineMay 2015 Issue 66, Page 78

High Profile Diving Educators Join RAID UK

***BREAKING NEWS***BREAKING NEWS*** Overnight training agency RAID has issued the following statement; "RAID UK along with RAID International is excited and very proud to announce two of the most prominent UK diving educators have joined the RAID Team. We welcome Paul Haynes and Charles Hawkes to RAID and as RAID Instructor Trainers.

Paul Haynes, Haynes Marine, Royal Marine Commando, technical diver, RAID UK, RAID International, HMS Prince of Wales, Bell recovery, MoD, BSAC, PSAI, Rebreather Forum 3, Paul Toomer, James Rogers, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, scuba diving PR, diving event management
Paul Haynes

Paul and Charles need no introduction to the dive world and their respective resumes read like an encyclopaedia of diving. For example, Paul first dived in 1989 while serving as a Royal Marine Commando and quickly developed a passion for sports diving. As Director of Haynes Marine (www.haynesmarine.com), a specialist diving consultancy, with a strong background in sport, occupational and military diving, he is an enormously experienced Technical diver. Known for his North Sea deep shipwreck exploration, amongst his other credentials, Paul holds several rebreather instructor trainer qualifications with BSAC and PSAI. He has worked on many diving expeditions including on behalf of the UK Ministry of Defence (MoD), the race to recover the ships bell from H.M.S. Prince of Wales, which was sunk in a depth of 75 meters / 225 feet in the South China Sea during WWII. Consequently Paul is a well sought after international speaker and because of his outstanding reputation within the Technical diving community and interpersonal skills, he will deliver an exceptional level of technical instructor development training for RAID UK and RAID generally.

On the other hand, Charles first started diving in 1976 in Fiji. He became a PADI instructor in 1986 and a PADI Course Director in 1998. He is a DSAT Tec Rec instructor Trainer. He also holds qualifications with DAN, TDI, ANDI, BSAC and IANTD. Charles has extensive dive retail experience, having managed and owned a busy five star IDC centre in Scotland for a number of years before becoming a freelance Course Director. More recently Charles has gained substantial experience working within the offshore and marine training industry, developing various training programmes and training systems including evaluating training techniques to include a variety of survival, marine, medical, radio and firefighting programmes.

Charles Hawks, RAID UK, PADI, DSAT Tec Rec Instructor, Paul Toomer, James Rogers, RAID International, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company,
Charles Hawks

Together Paul and Charles are proven people trainers with versatile skills in sales, marketing and communication. They bring unique training techniques to RAID’s growing online training platform and will work closely with RAID UK Directors James Rogers and Paul Toomer in educating divers and instructors to the RAID diver training system. Paul Haynes said; "The highly innovative approach to online learning and documentation management pioneered by RAID, combined with elevated diving standards, low carbon footprint and a comprehensive suite of training programmes offers divers and diving Instructors an exciting and progressively structured personal development path.  As a consequence I am delighted to be asked to join the RAID technical training management team and feel privileged to be part of what I feel is the most exciting development in the sport diving industry for a generation". Charles Hawkes said; “In the world of global training and instruction more and more industries are choosing computer based training systems for their in house and remote training programs. It is refreshing to see the way RAID have collaborated with industry experts to produced their suite of outstanding diver programmes. I’m looking forward to helping them roll out their refreshing ideas and concepts”. RAID International CEO, Jim Holliday, says, “We’re not going to brag about the achievements we’ve made at RAID in such a very short time since our relaunch earlier this year. We just want people to consider us as a serious alternative to other training agencies by taking a look at the quality of instructors, stores and diving personalities that have come on board since our relaunch. These highly creditable dive industry personalities know we have something special and I would like to personally add my congratulations and welcome Paul and Charles to our team”. Visit: www.diveraid.com

 

   

TEKDiveUSA.2014 Attendees To Receive A PADI Rebreather Checklist

PADI (Professional Association of Diving Instructors) has today confirmed that TEKDiveUSA.2014 attendees will receive a 'Type T' rebreather checklist in their conference bag.

PADI_Rebreather Checklist_RF3_Rebreather Forum 3_Dr Drew Richardson_Christian McDonald_AAUS_DAN_Dr Petar Denoble_Dr Neal W Pollock_Dr Richard D Vann_Rosemary E Lunn_Roz Lunn_The Underwater Marketing Company_TEKDiveUSA_EUROTEK_RF3 Consensus Statements_safety_rebreathers_checklists_Mark Caney_Karl Shreeves_scuba diving
PADI 'Type T' Rebreather / CCR Checklist

Two years ago this month PADI, along with the AAUS and DAN, hosted Rebreather Forum 3. This three day safety symposium was convened to address major issues surrounding rebreather technology, and its application in commercial, media, military, scientific, sport and technical diving. Experts, manufactures, instructor trainers, training agencies and divers from all over the world discussed this technology and shared information.

The programme included dedicated sessions covering topics such as medicine and physiology, closed circuit rebreather (CCR) orientation, business and operations, CCR familiarization, training, design and testing, and incident analysis.

Associate Professor Simon J Mitchell chaired the final session at RF3 and, as a result, 16 key consensus statements were agreed and ratified by the global rebreather community. You can hear this presentation by clicking here.

Two of the 16 consensus statements agreed at Rebreather Forum 3 concerned the use of checklists. RF3 acknowledged the overwhelming evidence demonstrating the efficacy of checklists in preventing errors and two recommendations were made. These are listed below.

REBREATHER FORUM 3 CONSENSUS STATEMENTS

CHECKLISTS:

The forum acknowledged the overwhelming evidence demonstrating the efficacy of checklists in preventing errors in parallel fields that share similar technical complexity. Two recommendations regarding checklists were consequently agreed:

1. CHECKLISTS

The forum recommends that rebreather manufacturers produce carefully designed checklists, which may be written and / or electronic, for use in the pre-dive preparation  (unit assembly and immediate pre-dive) and post-dive management of their rebreathers.

– Written checklists should be provided in a weatherproof or waterproof form.

– The current version of these checklists annotated with the most recent revision date should be published on the manufacturer’s website

2. CHECKLISTS

The forum recommends that training agencies and their instructors embrace the crucial leadership role in fostering a safety culture in which the use of checklists by rebreather divers becomes second nature.

 

TRAINING AND OPERATIONS:

1. TRAINING AND OPERATIONS

The forum applauds and endorses the release of pooled data describing numbers of rebreather certifications by training agencies, and encourages other agencies to join ANDI, IANTD, and TDI in this initiative

2. TRAINING AND OPERATIONS

The forum endorses the concept of making minimum rebreather training standards available in the public arena.

3. TRAINING AND OPERATIONS

The forum endorses the concept of a currency requirement for rebreather instructors. We recommend that training agencies give consideration to currency standards in respect of diving activity, class numbers, and unit specificity for their instructors.

4. TRAINING AND OPERATIONS

The forum recognizes and endorses the industry and training agency initiative to characterize “recreational” and “technical” streams of sport rebreather diver training. These groups will have different operational, training and equipment needs.

 

ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION

1. ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION

The forum recommends that training agencies provide rebreather divers  with a simple list of instructions that will mitigate common errors in evidence preservation after a serious incident or rebreather fatality.

– These instructions will be developed under the auspices of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society Diving Committee in consultation with the relevant RF3 presenters.

2. ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION

The forum endorses the concept of a widely notified centralized “on-call” consultation service to help investigators in avoiding errors or omissions in the early stages of a rebreather accident investigation, and to facilitate referral to expert investigative services.

3. ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION

The forum recommends that in investigating a rebreather fatality the principal accident investigator invite the manufacturer of the incident rebreather (or other relevant equipment) to assist with its evaluation (including the crucial task of data download) as early as is practicable.

4. ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION

The forum endorses the DAN worldwide initiative to provide a means of on-line incident reporting with subsequent analysis and publication of incident root causes.

 

DESIGN AND TESTING

1. DESIGN AND TESTING

The forum recommends that all rebreathers incorporate data logging systems which record functional parameters relevant to the particular unit and dive data, and which allow download of these data. Diagnostic reconstruction of dives with as many relevant parameters as possible is the goal of this initiative.

– Footnote: An ideal goal would be to incorporate redundancy in data logging systems, and as much as practical, to standardize the data to be collected

2. DESIGN AND TESTING

The forum endorses the need for third party pre-market testing to establish that rebreathers are fit for purpose. Results of a uniform suite of practically important unmanned testing parameters such as canister duration, and work of breathing (qualified by clear statements of experimental parameters) should be reported publicly. Ideally, this testing should be to an internationally recognized standard.

3. DESIGN AND TESTING

The forum acknowledges recent survey data indicating a poor understanding of rebreather operational limits in relation to depth and carbon dioxide scrubber duration among trained users, and therefore recommends:

1. that training organizations emphasize these parameters in training courses.

2. that manufacturers display these parameters in places of prominence in device documentation and on websites.

4. DESIGN AND TESTING

The forum strongly endorses industry initiatives to improve oxygen measurement technologies, and advocates consideration of potentially beneficial emerging strategies such as dynamic validation of cell readings and alternatives to galvanic fuel cells.

4. DESIGN AND TESTING

The forum identifies as a research question the issue of whether a mouthpiece retaining strap would provide protection of the airway in an unconscious rebreather diver.

6. DESIGN AND TESTING

The forum identifies as a research question the efficacy of a full face masks for use with sport rebreathers.

 

Scuba Schools International Appoints Technical Training Director, Adam Wood

Scuba Schools International (SSI), a premier education and business support organisation, is pleased to announce the appointment of Adam Wood as SSI Technical Training Director.

Adam Wood, SSI, Scuba Schools International, Steve Newman, Corrie Harris, technical diving instructor, Doug McNeese, Robert Stoss, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, Divemaster Scuba Nottingham, Tech XR, XR, TXR As one of the new breed of young dive professionals, Adam is striving to raise the bar of technical diving and challenge old perceptions and philosophies to make exceptional divers and instructors. Adam's passion is teaching, passing on knowledge & skills in Technical, Sidemount and Closed Circuit Rebreathers, both at user, instructor and instructor trainer level. He is focused on making diving aspirational, cool and exciting with the goal attracting a new divers and retaining old ones.

Adam owns one of the UK's largest certifying dive centres and is one of a select group of SSI Recreational, Technical and CCR Instructor Trainers. He was also a contributing editor to the new XR & TXR Technical & Technical CCR Materials for SSI. As one of the hardest working people in diving you can find Adam teaching almost every day either in one of the UK's satellite centres or in worldwide destinations.

"Having seen the benefits the SSI system brings to the dive centre I now want to blur the lines between recreational and technical diving whilst making the higher end of technical diving more extreme and safer than ever!" "I have supported the production of the recent XR and TXR materials and am underway with the next new releases – you better be excited!" commented Adam Wood, SSI Technical Training Director.

Robert Stoss, SSI President said "It is great to have Adam on board, we have been watching him grow in the technical diving auditorium and this is an excellent opportunity for us both, he knows how to structure new technical programs and understands how they will be implemented within the successful dive centre. He has a number of great projects planned for 2014 and with the new opportunities available within SSI we can take technical diving to the next level."

Adam has been lucky to be invited to be involved in some exciting projects around the world. More recently he has been contracted to work with and train the BBC Natural History unit, acting as trainer, technical advisor and dive supervisor.

TeXpediationR is a project Adam hopes will flourish, allowing all divers to participate in Expedition diving at their own level. Adam has acted on screen, been an aid to under water filming and provided logistical and technical support for worldwide projects, most recently he has been filming with the BBC in North Carolina inside the wreck of the Aeolus with over 200 Sand Tiger sharks.

Remember, SSI is not just a certification agency. WE ARE YOUR PARTNER IN BUSINESS! What we offer around the world is way ahead of even much larger industries. If you want to break the bonds that hold you back from reaching your potential, either email us or visit our website.

Attention CCR Instructors & Dive Centre Owners – we need your feedback

Pete Mesley of Lust4Rust (www.lust4rust.co) will be doing a presentation at OZtek Tech Diving Conference in March this year "Are rebreathers ready for the recreational diving industry - is the recreational Diving Industry ready for rebreathers?"

He really need to hear from Instructors and Dive Store owners alike. He would appreciated getting as many comments as possible, where you personally stand, your thoughts and comments.

Below is a few questions which he would be most grateful if you answered:

***

Pete Mesley, Lust4Rust, OzTek, tech divers, CCR divers, rebreather diver, CCR Instructors, rebreather instructor, resort diver, Dive Centre Owners, diving training agencies, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing CompanyTech divers have already embraced the technology. Training agencies and manufacturers are obviously going to directly benefit from expansion, but its in the trenches where Instructors are dealing with people all the time. I have categorized divers into 4 main groups (shown below), obviously there are more groups, but in the advent of simplicity and the relevance of the topic I have kept it to 4.

I would appreciate it if you could answer the questions below and any comments you might have on the topic. I have kept the questions to a minimum, but if you have any comments about the topic I would LOVE To hear them.

Can you please email me with all your comments.  Thank heaps, I really appreciate it.
- Pete

***

Categories of Diver

1. RESORT DIVER (only dive when on Holiday, little or no training, resort style diving)

2. AVERAGE DIVER (diver who does an average of 20 dives a year, goes on holiday with a few dives, own their own gear)

3. SERIOUS DIVING ENTHUSIAST (Diving is their main sport, heavily invested in diving, own their gear, but purely rec diving - no tech or deco)

4. Technical Diver (fanatical about diving, dives well beyond rec limits, does little else except dive, own all gear, invested lots of money in training, travel and gear)

FOR INSTRUCTORS

1. Do you think CCR Rebreathers have a place in the Recreational Dive Market?

2. Where do you see, them fitting in the market (from the list above)?

3. Are you preparing to train CCR's in the Rec market? - Who do you see as your biggest market?

4. Do you have any personal comments about CCR's in the rec industry?

FOR DIVE STORE OWNERS

1. Would you mix CCR divers on boats with O/C divers?

2. If someone was a CCR diver who wanted to do a longer bottom time would you be able to accommodate them?

3. Are you happy to change the routine of your dive business to accommodate this?

4. What is the average time people spend underwater each dive?

5. How many dives do you offer in a day?

6. Do you think that CCR diving in the recreational market is upon us?

7. What challenges do you envisage if you adopted CCR diving in your operation?

8. Are you interested in looking at becoming a CCR friendly operation?

9. Do you think that investing in Rebreather Support/Training/Equipment & Service is is going to benefit your business?

Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

Renowned Cave Explorer Rick Stanton awarded the MBE

World renowned cave explorer Rick Stanton has been made a Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) in the Queen's New Years’ honours list.

Rick Stanton, Cave Explorer, cave diver, Ressel, Eric Establie,Ardeche Gorge, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, MBE, New Years Honours ListRick is also a firefighter of some 23 years standing and has received the honour in recognition of his service to the communities of the West Midlands as a firefighter, and for the cave diving rescue services he carries out on a voluntary basis both in the UK and abroad.

It is the second honour of 2012 for Rick who was awarded a Bronze Medal from the Royal Humane Society for his efforts two years ago to recover the body of French diver Eric Establie, who was trapped at the Ardeche Gorge, near Marseille.

When we spoke to Rick earlier this morning he said he is very happy to be awarded the MBE.

"It isn’t particularly unusual for me to get official looking letters in the post because of my international rescue work, but when I got notification of this on behalf of the Palace I was absolutely astounded. I'm just doing work I enjoy to the best of my ability, but I'm thrilled to be awarded the MBE."

Rick has been involved in a number of rescue missions including six British soldiers who had become trapped in rising flood water in a cave in Mexico.

Rebreather Forum 3 Lecture; 'Thermal Physiology and Protection'

Rebreather Forum 3 - an international safety conference about rebreathers - was held in May 2012. Over the course of three days a number of presentations were given on many aspects of rebreather diving.

Dr Neal W Pollock, Neal Pollock, diving physiology, thermal physiology, breath hold diving, ice diving, thermal stress, DAN, Duke Dive Medicine, Divers Alert Network, Research Director, Rebreather Forum 3, RF3, Roz Lunn, Rosemary E Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, diving, scuba diving, technical diving, Fourth Element, Antarctic diving, ice diving, drysuit undergarments, thermal underwear, diving health, technical diving, HALO 3D, SITA, SITA Show, 2012 UK Diving Trade Show, Scuba Industries Trade Association

Dr Neal W Pollock, a diving physiologist from Divers Alert Network / Duke University gave a lecture on thermal physiology and protection.

THERMAL PHYSIOLOGY AND PROTECTION
Dr Neal W Pollock
9:15, Friday 18 May 2012, Boca Room III

“Diving is carried out in a wide range of environments and conditions. Thermal stress can be an important issue, particularly for the long exposures often associated with technical diving. Proper preparation can improve comfort, performance and safety. This presentation will discuss thermal stress, thermal protection, and implications for diving health.”

Dr Pollock's biography can be found here.

Photo Credit: Professor Simon J Mitchell

A Tri-partisan look at the state of Rebreathers by ANDI, TDI and IANTD @ RF3

One week today CCR Pioneer’s ANDI, IANTD and TDI will release historical training data at Rebreather Forum 3.  The three agencies have worked together and will announce the total number of divers certified on rebreathers.  This has not been done before, and it will give the Industry some idea of just how big the CCR (Closed Circuit Rebreather) market is.

Brian Carney, TDI President, TDI, SDI, ERDI, Rebreather stats, Rebreather Forum 3, RF3, Rosemary Lunn, Roz Lunn, TUMC, The Underwater Marketing Company, rebreather diver numbers, safety, rebreaher stats“There has been a lot of speculation out there about just how many people lean to dive on CCR’s”, stated TDI’s President Brian Carney.  “I am really glad to participate with Ed Betts of ANDI and Joe Dituri of IANTD and release our certification numbers”.

Joe Dituri, Tom Mount, IANTD, International Association of Nitrox and Technical Divers, TUMC, The Underwater Marketing Company, Rosemary Lunn, Roz Lunn, Rosemary E Lunn, Rebreather Forum 3, RF3, CCR, SCR, certified diver numbers“The rebreather industry is fickle and I laud the other big rebreather certification agencies getting together and setting the record straight,” stated IANTD’s Vice President Joe Dituri.  “I have never been more excited to be part of this growing culture.  Our cooperation is a win for the diving public”.

“Our corroboration will hopefully provide some clarity and result in a stronger, safer industry for all of us”, said Ed Betts, President of ANDI.  “Rebreather Forum 3 should be about improving safety and understanding.  Safety should not be a competitive issue”.

Ed Betts, Edward Betts, ANDI, American Nitrox Divers Inc, Dick Rutkowski, TUMC, The Underwater Marketing Company, Rebreather Forum 3, RF3, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, Rosemary Lunn, rebreather stats, safety stats, diving safety informationDue to the fact that ANDI, IANTD and TDI have slightly different ways of classifying rebreather certifications the numbers will be broken down as ‘Basic’, ‘Intermediate’ and ‘Advanced’ certifications by year.  Basic qualifications will include any entry level program to SCR’s (Semi-Closed Rebreather) and CCR’s.  Intermediate qualifications will include any training that includes minimal decompression.  Whilst Advanced qualifications will include Trimix and exploratory qualifications.  The companies will also be showing the difference between SCR and CCR certifications.

This information will be released post RF3 for anyone not able to attend this event and will be included in the published Conference Proceedings.

"20 Years of CCR Training Data from ANDI, IANTD and TDI" will be presented on Friday 18th May 2012 at 11:30 in Boca Room IV, Caribe Royale by Ed Betts, Brian Carney and Joe Dituri

 

2012 is 'The Year Of The Rebreather'

Christian Heylen, General Manager of PURE Red Sea (Professional Underwater Rebreather Explorers) will be exhibiting at Rebreather Forum 3.  We asked him why he’s taking part in this event.

Christian Heylen, PURE Rebreather College, Rebreather Forum 3, RF3, Rosemary Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, Rosemary E Lunn, RF3 Exhibitor, Red Sea rebreathers, rebreather friendly resort, Poseidon, Poseidon rebreather, DAN, Thermal physiology, US Coastguard, CCR fatalities, Divers Alert Network, PADI, AAUS, PADI Rebreather courses“2012 is definitely the year of the rebreather revolution and RF3 is the rebreather event to be at in 2012.  There’s no way I’m missing this!  Divers are coming to the Orlando conference from every corner of the world, to listen to the latest developments and most up to date information on rebreather diving.  As the specialized rebreather operator in the Red Sea, there is no better opportunity for us to present our services to those divers looking for dedicated and exclusive rebreather diving in one of the best diving spots of the world.

Why do I consider 2012 to be ‘the year of the rebreather’?  Until recently rebreathers were considered a piece of technical equipment for experienced divers.  Today rebreather technology has developed to a level where new divers can now dive safely on a rebreather, ie the Poseidon Discovery MK-VI.

Before manufactures were trying to make their units as advanced as possible for deep trimix and cave diving.  Now they are looking to make their units as simple, foolproof and safe as possible.  This will mean there will be big changes in the rebreather world and this is probably the reason that 2012 is the year of RF3 too!  We are in for a very exciting time.

I’m looking forward to the networking, seeing good friends and making new business contacts.  However being a passionate rebreather diver I’m also hoping to find new opportunities to explore new places around the world with my rebreather.

Christian Heylen, PURE Rebreather College, PURE diving, Tek Diving, rebreather friendly resort, sorb, The Underwater Marketing Company, Rosemary E Lunn, Rosemary Lunn, Roz Lunn, Rebreather Forum 3, RF3, rebreather conference, PADI, DAN, AAUS, Thermal physiology, Peter Denoble, Richard D Vann, Dick Vann, Dr Richard Vann, Neal PollockI also want to know everything the manufactures are planning and the new stuff coming out.  That promises to be very exciting.  And personally as a rebreather diver I want to learn about all the latest upgrades I can put onto my rebreather for my own deep diving and expeditions.  RF3 is going to be an excellent place to source new places, centres, boats and destinations to dive.

With rebreather diving becomes more mainstream, more dive centres, instructors and professionals are going to be involved with this aspect of diving.  It will all make it far easier to take your breather on holiday with you.  The logistics will be sorted and there will be breather friendly facilities in far-flung places with sorb, cylinders and oxygen fills etc. 

With so many topics being presented by many renowned experts in their fields I know this is going to be something special.  There are going to be great presentations by DAN, (Thermal Physiology, OC and CCR Fatalities, and Coastguard Investigations).  And I’m also looking forward to the Rebreathing Testing, Scrubber Technology and CO2 monitoring talks.”

If you want to join Christian Heylen at Rebreather Forum 3, it’s time to book your ticket for Rebreather Forum 3.  Log onto www.rf30.org for full details.

What's Rebreather Forum 3 all about? Neal W Pollock explains

“The main aim of RF3 is to evaluate the state of the art”, stated Dr Neal W Pollock, DAN’s Research Director and one of the organisers behind RF3.  “In a nutshell the theme of RF3 is to improve understanding, which we hope will translate to improved safety across the board.  We can always do things better.  So it is a rationality check to see if we can make things safer.

Rebreather Forum 3, RF3, Rubicon Foundation, DAN, Divers Alert Network, Research Director, Neal W Pollock, Neal Pollock, Rosemary E Lunn, Roz Lunn, The Underwater Marketing Company, AAUS, PADI, Rebreather safety, Simon Mitchell, Jill Heinerth, APD, Ambient Pressure Diving, Martin Parker, Cognitas, Incident reporting, diving safety, BSAC Incident ReportWe’re therefore going to assess the current situation re manufacturing, testing, training and diving protocols to check that we are doing this as safely as we can, and highlight areas that need improving so that we can move forward.  Hence we’ve convened this Conference to put a lot of opinions into the room, rather than relying on a set of interpretations from one particular organization or company.  Doing it this way allows us to pull together all the different views and we then analyse the results through one lens.

The training agencies all say we are doing it right, so therefore why do we still have a number of fatalities every year?  At RF3 we intend to be as honest as we can about issues and address every one of them.  This may sound to some divers that we are suggesting current standards are dangerous.  We are not.  Our ethos is more along the lines of ‘how can we do it better and safer’?

So why will RF3 be useful to the Industry?  When you understand where something is failing; be it manufacturing, training or diving protocols, then everyone benefits from knowing how failures can occur.  Then we can see and evaluate how to successfully improve performance.”

You can be part of this important peer review, just log onto www.rf30.org, check out the agenda and book your tickets to the most significant rebreather conference this decade; Rebreather Forum 3.  You’ll kick yourself if you miss it!